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April Harris Jackson

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Nashville Wills and Trusts Lawyer: How to Handle Underage Beneficiaries

Many grandparents wish to leave a legacy behind for their grandchildren; however, they may run into some issues if those children are underage. A Nashville Wills and Trusts lawyer can help you determine what the best options are for leaving assets to underage beneficiaries, whether those assets are held in a Will or Trust, financial accounts, or as part of a life insurance benefit. 

Underage Beneficiaries in a Will or Trust

As a Nashville Will and Trust lawyer, I always ask my clients if any of their beneficiaries are underage, or even if they would like to keep younger beneficiaries from accessing their full inheritance until they’ve reached a certain age, which is usually 25 or even 30. If the children are underage, an adult guardian must be named since minors are not allowed to own property. If a significant amount of property is left to the minor, a Trust is usually a good idea to manage the property until the child comes of age. In fact, Trusts can be used to ensure the minor only receives their full inheritance once they reach a certain age or milestone, such as graduating from college, while at the same time providing assets to make sure the child can achieve that milestone. I can speak with you about leaving an inheritance to an underage child and will help you choose the best option for administering the distributions.

Underage Beneficiaries of Financial Accounts

Many people choose to make beneficiary designations directly on their financial accounts, such as savings accounts, annuities, and retirement plans.  Nashville Wills and Trusts lawyers urge their clients to carefully examine the details surrounding these beneficiary designations, as minor beneficiaries often cannot directly inherit assets after your passing. It is important to consult with a Nashville Wills and Trusts lawyer to determine the best way for your underage beneficiaries to receive the inheritance you leave for them at a time when they can make informed financial decisions on their own. Directing the assets to Trust is often the best bet in these situations, but consulting with an attorney will give you a much better idea of how this should be done. 

Underage Beneficiaries on Life Insurance

Many parents and grandparents name their children or grandchildren as beneficiaries on their life insurance policies. As with the cases above though, an adult guardian or a Trust must be named in order to hold the life insurance proceeds until the minors come of age. It is generally not advised to name minors as beneficiaries to life insurance policies, as courts will often appoint an adult to look after the proceeds until the child comes of age – and that adult may not be someone you would have wanted to be appointed to such a role. Speaking with a Nashville Wills and Trusts lawyer may help you determine the best way to handle your life insurance beneficiary designations.

If you have any questions about the best ways to leave an inheritance to underage beneficiaries, please contact us at 615-846-6201 to set up a consultation.

Will the Government Take Your Assets if You Do Not Have a Will in Place?

Will the Government Take Your Assets if You Do Not Have a Will in Place?

One concern I frequently hear is a worry that the government will take assets from a loved one or take assets from an estate instead of family members inheriting it. These are valid concerns because there are specific instances where this can happen, but as a general rule, the government DOES NOT take assets unless they have a legal reason for doing so.

The State of Tennessee will not take your assets

There are a few instances where the government will take your assets if you die without a will. For example, if someone received Medicaid (TennCare) to pay for long-term care, if they owed back taxes, or if no family members can be located. But, as a general rule, the State of Tennessee is not going to take your assets.

Tennessee will find your closest heirs

The State of Tennessee has a statute that lays out how your assets will pass if you die without a will. Your assets will pass to what we call your heirs at law. Those are really the people that you probably think of as your closest relatives: your spouse, your children, your grandchildren, your parents, your siblings, your nieces and nephews, your cousins, and farther out. But it’s the close relatives that the state will seek out.

Generally, the government is going to look for anyone related to you before they get any money. I hope that sharing this information with you has given you a sense of relief if you were told inaccurate information elsewhere.

If you have other questions about your estate or that of a loved one, click here to schedule a call with us.

How to Disinherit Someone in a Will

How to Disinherit Someone in a Will

Is there someone you have considered leaving out of your Will? There are plenty of reasons for wanting to exclude someone, a group of people, or everyone you know from inheriting from you. Maybe you’ve had a falling out, maybe they haven’t kept in touch like you hoped, or maybe you just like animals better.

image of a pitbull dog wearing a batman costume. Attorney April Harris Jackson jokes about leaving everything to her dogs in her will. So, how do you disinherit someone in a will?
Personally, my dog is probably getting everything before I die. Look at this cute face

People who know me are probably tired of hearing me say it, but I believe that no one is entitled to an inheritance. Whatever you want to do with your earthly possessions is entirely up to you. There’s no wrong decision- whether you want to leave everything to your children, your church, or your dog. It’s just a personal decision, like your hairstyle (although a bit more permanent decision).

If you don’t have a Will, the law in Tennessee leaves your estate to your closest relatives. By making a Will, you can leave your assets to anyone you like. The only exception to this is that you cannot disinherit your spouse or minor children.

If you don’t want your spouse or kids to inherit because you don’t like them, I hope you will consider counseling. However, that’s another personal decision. So is divorce, which is the only way to remove your spouse’s right to inherit from you. If you don’t like your kids, you have to wait until they turn eighteen to disinherit them.

If you want to disinherit someone, I encourage you to make it clear in your Will. If your Will goes through the probate process, the Court will look at what your intentions were. Leaving a nominal sum like $10 means that the person is not truly disinherited- they inherited $10. We like to acknowledge that the person has been disinherited and, depending on the situation, a brief statement about why. We are kind but firm to reduce any confusion or potential for a contest in the future.

And remember, relationships change and so do Wills.

If you would like help creating your estate plan, click here to schedule a call with us.